November 2009 - Poker Root

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Tuesday, November 24, 2009

High Stakes Poker Season 6, New Co-host Kara Scott and Starting Lineup

November 24, 2009 1
The 6st season of High Stakes Poker will air February 14, 2010. Changes include new co-host Kara Scott who will be replacing A.J. Benza.



GSN Vice President of Programming and Development David Schiff said;



We’re into the sixth season and we felt like it was time to freshen it up. Our feeling was that we wanted viewers to be in the room with the players. Gabe and A.J. did a good job, but they were disconnected from the action.




Kara Scott,







Starting lineups for the



Day 1:



  • Dwan
  • Ivey
  • Negreanu
  • Esfandiari
  • Minieri
  • Gus Hansen
  • Andreas Hoivoid
  • Phil Hellmuth


Day 2:



  • Dwan
  • Ivey
  • Negreanu
  • Antonius
  • Dennis Phillips
  • Lex Veldhuis
  • Andrew Robl
  • Barry Greenstein


Day 3:



  • Dwan
  • Ivey
  • Negreanu
  • Benyamine
  • Elezra
  • D. Brunson
  • Matusow
  • Elky










  • Phil Ivey
  • Daniel Negreanu
  • Phil Hellmuth
  • Tom "durrrr" Dwan
  • Doyle Brunson
  • Mike Matusow
  • Patrik Antonius
  • Antonio Esfandiari
  • Barry Greenstein
  • Dennis Phillips
  • David Benyamine
  • Eli Elezra
  • Yevgeniy Timoshenko
  • Allan Meltzer
  • Lex Veldhuis
  • Sammy George
  • Andreas Hoivold










World Series of Backgammon











Bonuses:

- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker

- 378% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
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UFC Poker After Dark and UFC 106

November 24, 2009 1
UFC Poker After Dark

A new episode of Poker After Dark is coming out. It's a special episode with UFC fighters Randy "The Natural" Couture, Dan "Hollywood" Henderson and UFC announcer Bruce Buffer. Along for the match are Full Tilt Pros Patrik Antonius, "The Professor" Howard Lederer and Erick "E-Dog" Lindgren.

UFC Poker After Dark


I've watched Bruce Buffer play and he's a great player! I watched him play at 2007 WSOP and he outplayed Chris MoneyMaker but got unlucky. Buffer talked about the show on his blog: BufferZone. He said Henderson impressed him and Couture was a cerebral player. It should be a great match!

There are a bunch of other Poker After Dark episodes coming up soon including $150,000 Buy-in Cash Game with Tom "Durrrr" Dwan which should be good!

UFC 106

I watched the UFC 106 preliminary fights on Spike TV on the weekend, I haven't seen the main card yet. My favourite fight was the Kendall Grove Vs. Jake Rosholt‎ fight. Rosholt‎ slammed Kendall 3 times, he's a strong dude! Rosholt was overpowering Kendall but lost after getting caught in a triangle submission. I heard the Tito Ortiz vs. Forrest Griffin was a close fight.

Randy Couture fought at UFC 105 and clearly lost the match 29-28 but the judges gave Couture the win. I understand the reasonsing for the judges decision. The match meant everything to Couture, if he loses this match then it may very well be his last fight. Couture mentioned he was going to take his last run at the light heavy weight title before retiring. I think it's amazing that he is still fighting at this high level at age 46!

Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 378% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
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Big Blind Play in Limit Hold'em - Jennifer Harman

November 24, 2009 1
Jennifer Harman
In Limit Hold 'em, the big blind is one of the toughest position to play. You're out of position, and that's never a good thing, but usually, you'll be getting excellent odds to continue with the hand. Against a single opponent who has raised, you'll be getting better than 3 to 1 and, in most hands, you're no more than a 2 to 1 dog. The problem is, you'll often find yourself going into the flop with shaky cards and, at that point, you're sure to face some tough decisions.

Before I talk about some tricky situations that develop in the big blind, I want to note that you can make your life a little easier by folding some hands pre-flop. If you're holding a medium Ace and you're facing an early position raise from a player who you know plays only good cards up front, then fold. It may seem like you're getting a nice price to continue, but in this spot, you're only going to get into trouble. When you miss the flop completely, it's going to be tough to continue and, if you hit an Ace, you may lose a lot to a hand that has you dominated. I'd rather play 6-7 against an early position raise from a tight player than A-7.

There are some hole cards that are just hopeless. If I'm facing a raise from any position and I find something like J-2, T-3, or 9-4. I'm going to surrender the hand.

The really difficult situations arise when you hold a mediocre hand, something like A-8 or pocket 6s, and you face a raise from late position. Many players will raise with just about anything in the cutoff or on the button, so it's tough to know where you stand with these medium strength hands.

What should you do?

Unfortunately, there are no easy answers. My best advice is to vary your play so as to take advantage of a particular opponent's tendencies. For example, if you hold A-8 in the big blind and face a late-position raise from a player who tends to be a little weak after the flop, you should probably re-raise pre-flop and then follow up with a bet on the flop most of the time. Against this type of player, this kind of action will force a lot of folds.

If the opponent who raises in late position is tricky and very aggressive post flop, I'll often call the pre-flop raise and then check-raise on most flops, whether or not I got a piece of the board. Even if the check-raise doesn't win the pot, this move helps keep a tough, aggressive player off balance.

Of course, you'll need to consider the flop as you move forward in the hand. If you call a pre-flop raise with pocket 6s and see a flop of T-Q-K, there's little point in going to war. Give your opponent credit for some hand that beats yours and look for a better spot. But this doesn't mean that you should be willing to give up on anything less than top pair.

Against a single opponent, I'll play second pair pretty aggressively. Sometimes, I'll lead at the pot with this hand, and sometimes, I'll check-raise with it. Taking this aggressive approach with a shaky hand allows me to play my big hands in the same manner. When my opponents see me check-raise, they won't know if I'm making this play with as little as second pair or as much as a set.

As I said earlier, playing from the big blind in limit poker is tricky. In my opinion, it's one of the toughest spots in all of poker. My best advice is that you should stay alert to your opponent's tendencies and look to mix up your play. If you're on your game, it will be tough for other players to put you on a hand while you'll have a pretty good idea of what they're doing.

Good luck.

Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 378% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

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