August 2009 - Poker Root

Hot

Post Top Ad

Saturday, August 29, 2009

First Time Playing Live:) - At CNE Casino

August 29, 2009 5
First time I played at a Casino, it was pretty fun! I played $5/$10 limit..Ended up $57.50:) I hate limit, and every hand is like 6 way to the flop lol. Wish I hit one set.. The cool thing is, the casino is only 20min bike ride from my place so I can go there any time I want. There were so many different kind of poker games..including Three Card Poker which my friends liked.

Anybody else play live?






Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Saturday, August 22, 2009

2 Months 2 Million, 2m2mm – Episode 1

August 22, 2009 1
Four of the world's best online poker players take Vegas by storm in G4s newest original series, "Two Months. Two Million." These former high school math whizzes risk it all with their own money and have one goal in mind: win two million dollars in only two months. Its a high risk gamble you wont want to miss. Complicating their task are all the temptations of their new found Vegas lifestyle; the money, the women and a massive Las Vegas mansion. They have the brains to win if they can keep their minds on poker.

Episode 1, Part 1:


Episode 1, Part 2:


Visit the "Two Months. Two Million." official website for hilarious behind-the-scenes footage, episode highlights, expert poker tips, bios and more at: http://www.2m2mm.com

Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Interview With David Sklansky

Bad Position, Decent Cards - Howard Lederer

August 20, 2009 1
In the middle and later stages of tournaments, there are often times when you're forced to make a pretty big commitment on a relatively weak holding. These are uncomfortable spots because you never want to risk a large percentage of your chips with a mediocre hand. Things get even more difficult when you're playing from the blinds and out of position.

For example, say you're playing late in a tournament. The blinds are $500 and $1,000, and there's a $100 ante. You're in the small blind with $18,000. It's folded around to the button, an aggressive player who raises frequently in late position. He has $30,000 in his stack and he raises to $3,500. You look at your cards and see Ad-9s.

You know that A-9 isn't a great hand, but you can't ignore it in this situation. First off, given your opponent's history, he may very well be raising with a hand that is far worse than yours. In fact, in this spot, he could very well have two rags. Another consideration is that there are a lot of chips in play. Between the blinds, antes, and your opponent's raise, you stand to pick up over $5,000 in chips if you can take down this pot, which would be a nice addition to your short stack.

So, you're probably going to want to play this hand. But what's the best action?

At first, it might seem that calling is a reasonable course, as it would keep you from getting overly committed on this marginal hand. But calling has some pretty big downsides. With a hand like A-9, you're usually not going to like the flop very much. In fact, you'll fail to make as much as a pair about two-thirds of the time. If you do flop a pair of 9s, how are you going to proceed if the flop also has an over card? Even on an Ace-high flop, you'll have a tough time knowing if your hand is good.

What's more, if you miss the flop completely, you leave yourself vulnerable to being outplayed. It's going to be very hard to bet if the flop contains three cards that don't help your hand. If you check, your opponent will likely make a continuation bet, and you'll be hard-pressed to continue, even though Ace-high might be good.

In spots like this, your best move is to press an edge while you have it - before the flop. Re-raise all-in pre-flop. Your opponent probably won't have a hand that he can call with and, if he does, you'll have plenty of outs. You still have about a 25% chance against AK, for example. Not good, but not dead.

The important thing to keep in mind is that, in the later stages of a tournament, you don't want to make many decisions after the flop when you have a medium-strength hand like Ace-middle kicker or middle pocket pair, and you're playing out of position. Put your chips in while you think you have the best of it, and hope for the best. If you let these marginal but good situations pass you by, you might regret it later when your stack has been whittled down even further.

Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Poker Pro Daniel Negreanu Accused of Being Racist?

August 19, 2009 3
There was a article written about Daniel Negreanu, calling him a racist for his thoughts about American TV-channel "Black Entertainment Network".

"Negreanu made some outrageous comments about the sensitive subject of race, comments that would have created a firestorm if Negreanu had any relevance outside the poker world"


Here is part of what Negreanu wrote:

"While I was playing a mixed 400/800 game, listened to music, and watched BET (black entertainment), it suddenly hit me. How on earth can a TV channel have this name?"

"I know that there are black artists standing for the entertainment in this show and that they are targeting black TV viewers. And of course there is nothing wrong in targeting a specific group of people. But is it really okay to call a channel for Blacks Entertainment Network?!"

"I watch the channel, and I hope that's no problem. It's just the thought if for example a guy in Alabama would start a TV-network and call it "White Entertainment Television/group". My Guess is that people would get really angry and upset then."


Daniel responds: "As for the article the guy wrote, I think he was brilliant. He threw out a big, eye-catching title like ‘Daniel Negreanu a racist?’ and it did wonders for the site. They got lots of hits. It’s a really low class move to try and increase traffic at your site that way, but hey, it really does work."

Nothing Negreanu said was racist and like he said, it was a mere publicity stunt to incrase traffic to their site.

One member on 2 Plus 2 Forum made a joke : Proof that Daniel Negreanu is not a racist and has lots of black friends.






Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Inducing a Bluff - Layne Flack

August 19, 2009 1
Beginners come to poker thinking that the bluff has one simple purpose: To take pots when you don't have a hand that can win at showdown. In No-Limit Hold 'em, however, the bluff can be used in many different ways. As a recent tip by Huck Seed pointed out, a good player can use the threat of a bluff to force an opponent into making a very bad call.

For this tip, I thought I'd show another way you can use the bluff to your advantage. Using this technique, you'll neither be bluffing nor threatening to bluff, but rather, you'll be convincing an opponent to bluff in a situation where you almost certainly have the best hand.

Say you're playing a game of No-Limit Hold 'em and you raise in middle position with Kh-Qh. You're called by two players - one behind you and one in the blind. You're thrilled to see the flop: 2h-7h-Th. You flopped a flush. The big blind checks to you and you bet. (Note that I highly recommend betting in this sort of situation. Betting the made hand often does more to disguise the strength of your holding than slow playing does.)

Your bet is called by the late position player. What's he calling with? Maybe he has a Ten or the Ah. The turn is a blank, the 3c. You bet again, and once again are called. Now the river is another blank, the 4d, making the board 2h-7h-Th-3c-4d. What's your play?

On the river you should consider checking - but not because you're worried that your opponent has a better hand. Rather, since your opponent called on the river, you have to consider what he may have. It's hard to bluff on three consecutive streets, and most players won't launch that third bullet. So, after calling you on the flop and turn, your opponent may look at something like top pair and give up, thinking that you must have him beat if you're willing to fire at this pot three times. Or, if he only has the Ah, he'll have no choice but to fold. Either way, there'll be essentially no way for you to get any value out of the hand by betting.

If you check, however, you let your opponent stab at the pot. If he's got just the Ah, he may be inclined to see your check as a sign of weakness. He'll fire at the pot in desperation, hopeful that he can force a fold. Then you'll call and take a nice pot.

Remember, your opponent's broken draws offer great opportunities for you to induce bluffs. When you have a hand and you appear to be up against a draw that doesn't get there by the river, you stand to make the most by checking to your opponent, who can then do his best to pick up the pot by betting. It's a great technique, and yet another way you can use the bluff to your advantage.

Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Documentary On Compulsive Gambling - Bill Kearney AKA: "The Comeback Kid"

August 19, 2009 1
Bill KearneyBill Kearney, a former casino gambler, shares his story about how he lost over $1 million in 6 months. He also talks about how there are no safe guards to protect someone from becoming a compulsive gambler.

My advice,

-Don't play casino games that involve only luck. Than you are bound to lose.
-Have a separate Bank Account for Gambling
-Practice the games online first with a Free Bankroll



Bonuses:
- Free $150 Bankroll at Titan Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Back to Basics - David Grey

August 04, 2009 1
I play in some of the biggest cash games in the world. Usually, these games are loaded with pros - folks who know the intricacies and advanced strategies of pretty much every poker game. We normally play a mix of games that can include Hold ‘em, 7-Stud, Omaha, and one or more of the Hi/Lo variations. Most of the time, we play with a fixed-limit betting structure.

In a recent session, I had a stretch where I was pretty card dead, so I spent most of my time folding. To my knowledgeable opponents, it must have appeared that I was playing especially tight. Then in a game of 7-Stud, I was dealt an Ace as my up-card. The bring-in bet had been raised and I re-raised.

Then, two top-rate pros with no more than their antes in the pot called my re-raise. There are only a couple of hands that might justify their calls. However, as the hand proceeded with me as the aggressor, it became clear that the callers of my third-street re-raise didn't have much at all. One held three unconnected hearts, the other had a middle pair with no kicker.

What were these guys thinking? It's hard to know, but my guess is that one of them let his desire to gamble get the better of him. Though that can pay dividends in well-chosen spots, this wasn't one of them. The other might have thought he could outplay me later in the hand.

In the end, neither of their strategies makes much sense. I made it expensive enough that it was a lousy spot to gamble, and given that I've declared that I have a pair of aces, there's little chance that I'm going to get bluffed out of the pot.

I think this hand highlights a couple of the mental traps that sometimes snag advanced players. As players improve, they inevitably see more opportunities for profit, and thus, see potential in a greater number of hands. But it's a slippery slope, and a player can easily lose the long view and convince himself that he can make any starting hand work out.

This just isn't the case - especially when playing fixed-limit games. Even at the highest levels, profitability in limit poker is largely determined by a player's ability to choose the right starting hands. If you fail in this regard or somehow lose your discipline, it's nearly impossible to recover. Fancy plays and good decisions on later streets cannot overcome early-hand mistakes. If you're throwing money into a pot when you shouldn't, you're going to lose money. There's no way around it.

If you find yourself in a stretch where things aren't going especially well, take a step back and make sure your hand selection is all it ought to be. Review the previous tips from the other Full Tilt Poker pros. Jennifer Harman has written on hand selection in Stud-8, Omaha-8, Razz,and Perry Friedman has written about third street decisions in 7-Stud.

Always remember that in limit poker, hand selection is the foundation for your entire game. You can't build a solid game on a weak foundation.

Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Which Would You Reather Be Dealt, AK Suited or Jacks? (Poll Archive)

August 04, 2009 1
WHICH WOULD YOU RATHER BE DEALT?

AK Suited 60 (57%)
JJ 45 (42%)


Total Votes: 105
Started: June 28, 2009
Ended: July 28, 2009
Read More

BankrollMob: One Of My Favourite Pokersites

August 04, 2009 1
BankrollMob is one of my favourite websites. My favourite part of BRM is chatting in the forums. What's cool is BRM pays 10 cents per post and 10 cents every poll you vote in. Then there's other contests like "Guess when BRM hits 50,000 posts", I won that for a cool $100:) I also won a few other contests for $10 each. There's a mob safe with a 3 digit number. If you guess the number correctly, you win the money in side. You get once chance to crack it every day (So 1 in 1000), you can also buy shots at cracking it. I haven't cracked it yet:)



There are also poker bonuses such as $50 Free at Pacific Poker. And a free Poker Gift at Party Poker, which you get $50 free if you pay like $2.50 in rake which is 2000% rakeback!

Anyway, if you want to sign up to Bankrollmob, it's free. Just click here, don't forget to say hi to me in the forums:)

Bonuses:
- Free $100 Bankroll at Full Tilt Poker
- 27% Rakeback at Full Tilt Poker
Read More

Post Top Ad